Month: March 2019

Best way to fence and house pigs

If you’re considering raising pigs for meat on your little ranch or property, you presumably need to understand how to house and fence them the right way.

Fencing for Small Enclosures

Pigs are significantly more specialized than goats at evading fencing. Most specialists suggest electric fencing, but also hog panels can be utilized. A few farmers keep hogs in a little enclosure with hog boards, guaranteeing that their space will be formed into mud in days to come. Pigs brought up this way require just around 10 square feet of room each. Their smell will be terrible. Furthermore, you will have pay for everything that they eat so as you can see, this is an expensive method of raising pigs.

Be that as it may, you might need to think about utilizing electric fencing to enclose your pigs in a bigger field. If you give them the adequate space that they need, they will spread their own droppings, adding fertilizer to the land (or you can haul the manure out and compost it with wood chips, straw and hay). The best method to pasturing pigs, as with any other animal, is rotational grazing. This simply means rotating them to new pasture as the present field gets muddy and churned. You can rotate them week by week, depending on the size of the pasture. Chickens, cattle, goats as well as sheep can all be raised this way.

Pigs eat grass as well as brush, so they can be used to clear territories that are increasingly rough.

The Best Housing for Pigs

For housing, pigs require a three-sided shield that will protect them from rain, wind and the sun. You can assemble this out of scrap wood, pallets or whatever else you have around. They should have win protection, have shade and be dry. That is about it. Ensure that your sanctuary has abundant ventilation.

Give them high-carbon bedding, for example, straw or hay to absorb their poop and urine and hold the smell.

Water is additionally a key piece of pig housing. Pigs do not only drink a lot of water but they need lots of it to wallow in and cool off occasionally. All these can end up getting the water dirty so ensure you provide them with fresh and clean water at all times.

Back to fencing. Pigs are brilliant. They will rapidly figure out how to regard an electric fence, regardless of whether that is woven wire fencing with a hot wire around nose level or a few strands of electric wire. Pigs cannot hop or jump, so it doesn’t need to be high—something like three feet high ought to do it. In any case, you will likewise need to ensure that you leave a non-electrified “entryway” for the pigs to leave and enter the pen, as they won’t cross a territory where the electric fence has been previously.

You can use electric net fencing as well as poly wire. Remember these tips:

  • For posts, T-posts or cedar posts function admirably.
  • Ensure you have a solid energizer, at least 2 joules, and 6 joules in the event that you can bear the cost of it.
  • Hog panels can likewise be useful for temporary pens.

7 Pool Maintenance Tips for the Winter

 

When the temperature starts to drop and snow begins falling, it is important to be mindful of how you take care of your swimming pool. The water can end up freezing, which can damage above ground pools. Even if you have an inground pool, proper care and maintenance will be critical. Keep on reading the rest of this post and learn from some of the tips we will be sharing.

 

Cover the Pool

 

One of the most important things to do is to use a high-quality pool cover. Because you will most likely be unable to use the pool during the winter, covering the top part is necessary to keep the debris and snow out. This will make the water stay clean!

 

Use a Pump

 

Having a cover will help, but it will not be enough. You will benefit from buying a top-rated pool cover pump. This will help in maintaining the strength and cleanliness of the cover. It pumps out the snow and debris that might have already accumulated on the top of the cover. Whether it is a manual or automatic pump, it will make your life a lot easier!

 

Clean the Pool

 

As a preparation for the winter, if you expect that the swimming pool will not be used in the next few weeks, you have to clean it first before having it covered. If there are dirt and debris on the pool before it is covered, this will obviously damage the quality of the water and will make cleaning more difficult once the cold season is over. You can use an above ground pool cleaner to make your life a lot easier.

 

Keep the Toys

 

Toys and floats are common items that are found in many swimming pools, especially if you have kids at home. As you prepare for the winter, you should deflate the toys and keep them in a safe place. Before doing so, it will also be a good idea to clean them first with water and bleach. Keep them in boxes to be protected from dust.

 

Treat the Pool

 

The chemistry of the pool is one of the most important in having it well-maintained, especially during the winter. Before you pack the pool for winter, check for the pH level. Ideally, it should be anywhere from 7.2 to 7.6, which is not too alkaline or acidic.

 

Run the Filter

 

Aside from treating the water, pool filtration is also an important concern when it comes to its winterization. Before packing up, run the filter until you can see that the water is already clear. Check the filter cartridges and have them replaced when necessary.

 

Regularly Inspect the Pool

 

Even if you have already followed the things that have been mentioned above, this does not mean that you can leave the pool on its own. As a responsible pool owner, you still have to check it every now and then to prevent any problem from escalating.

 

References:

Pool Maintenance Tips For Winter

https://royallifesavingwa.com.au/your-safety/at-home/winter-pool-maintenance

 

Why are ball pythons great pets

The ball python is a decent snake for a new snake owner. Growing to be about 5 feet long when mature, ball pythons are not as vast as most constricting snakes that people keep as pets but they are very accommodating and quite easy to handle.

  • Names: Ball (Python regius)
  • Size: Up to 5 feet
  • Lifespan: Typically 20 to 30 years, but some love to be more than that

Temperament and Behavior of Ball Pythons

Ball pythons earned their names from the way they fold themselves into a tight ball when threatened, tucking their head inside their curls. Young ball pythons grow up to one foot every year until they’re three years. They can live for quite a while with the right kind of care.

Housing Ball Pythons

Ball pythons are not terribly dynamic snakes so a small enclosure should suffice (Using a 30-gallon tank for a mature one and a 10- to 20-gallon tank for younger snakes). They can escape if given the chance so ensure a tight lid is provided.

There are several alternatives for substrate for your snake including Astroturf, newsprint and shredded barb. Provide a dark hiding spot and some sturdy branches within the cage for your snake.

An under the tank heating tank intended for reptiles functions admirably but monitoring the temperature is difficult.

Never utilize hot rocks with pet reptiles and ensure the bulb or heat component is screened off so it does not come in contact with the snake and cause burns.

Provide a dish sufficient enough for the snake to take a dip in and soak. The snake soaks a lot during shedding season. Another option is to provide a humidity retreat, which likewise utilizes a secured compartment with an entrance gap fixed with damp sphagnum or paper towels to provide the required moisture.

Water and Food

Ball pythons can fed medium sized rats or small mice, depending on the size of the snake and this should be every week or two. Young snakes ought to be fed fuzzy mice every 5 to 7 days while full-grown snakes can be fed a larger prey as they can go up to two weeks before their next meal. Use pre-killed prey since live mice can harm a snake. Dangling the prey before the snake with forceps usually makes the snake interested in the meal.

Common Health Problems

As with other snakes, the ball python suffers from inclusion body disease. Indeed, even captive bred ball pythons can sometimes refuse to eat for a couple of months.  For whatever length of time this happens and it does not affect the snake’s body weight and condition, this is not problematic.

In the event that your snake refuses to eat for a while, cautiously analyze the environment, health, handling and husbandry farming to be absolutely sure the snake is not stressed out.

Choosing a Ball Python

When you finally decide to get your own ball python, search for a captivity bred and young python (you may need to discover a breeder for this). Go for a snake that has a vent, clean eyes and a well-rounded body and does not display any of the symptoms of respiratory problems (wheezing, bubbles around nostrils).

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