Month: January 2019

Central American boa as a pet

Central American Boa Female

Central American boas incorporate boa constrictors from Panama, Costa Rica, Belize and other Central American nations. They have an extensive variety of morphs and colours, which are varieties not the same as those regularly found in the forests. They make extraordinary pets and are less demanding to maintain and handle when compared to other bigger snakes.

Central American Boa Female

Central American Boa Female

  • Scientific Name: Boa constrictor imperator
  • Common Names: Common Boa, Central American Boa.
  • Lifespan: 20 to 35 years
  • Size: 4 to 6 feet

Central American Boa Temperament and Behavior

While it is difficult to consider any substantial snake an extraordinary “starter” snake, boas are prevalent with first-time owners and this is due to their well-behaved nature. The Central American Boa is somewhat more aggressive than its Columbian counterpart, but with proper handling and care, it reveals its docile nature.

The snake should be handled a lot during the week to gradually build up the trust between snake and owner.

As with other snakes, wash hands before and after handling.

Housing the Central American Boa

While little, boas ought to be housed in a 10 to 15-gallon vivarium or an enclosure 1 foot wide and 2 feet long. As the boa grows, they ought to be introduced to their final place of rest, which ought to be somewhere around 2 feet wide and 4 feet long. Similarly, as with any snake, a place to rest and get away from everything else.

Water and Food

A youthful boa requires regular feedings than the bigger grown-ups, so plan on feeding the Central American boa once weekly until it gets to around 2 to 3 feet long. From then on, you can feed them once every 10 days and one in 2 weeks when mature. It is vital not to overfeed your boa because this could lead to serious health issues later on.

Boas are suckers for rats and mice but be sure to watch them feed, especially when feeding them live animals.

With the right training, they can be transitioned to eating frozen or dead food. Warm up food in warm water and never use a microwave which could cook the inside of the food.

A solid water bowl sufficiently extensive for the boa to splash inside ought to likewise be incorporated into the housing. The water ought to be changed out day by day and will help keep the moistness up inside the housing.

Substrate

The base of the boa’s vivarium or tank ought to be fixed with a fitting substrate for bedding. Snake carpet, cypress mulch, aspen, paper towels or newspapers are all ideal.

Pine or cedar mulch is toxic to reptiles so do well to stay away from them. Also, design the inside of the housing with small plants, rocks and sticks.

Warmth

A varying temperature should be present in the housing. This ought to incorporate a hot luxuriating zone somewhere in the range of 90 and 95 degrees F and a cooler region somewhere in the range of 78 and 82 degrees F. Warmth sources can be basking bulbs, under tank heaters, hot rocks, ceramic heaters and heat pads.  Concealing spots for both the hot and cool segments should be included in the housing and they ought to be indistinguishable.

Basic Health Problems

Common health problems can include dermatitis, respiratory diseases, parasites and inclusion body disease.

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